September 2015

Jane Dunhamn’s experience in disability related fields spans 40 years. For the past decade, Ms. Dunhamn’s work has focused on the intersections of race and disability.

Ms. Dunhamn is a founding member of the National Black Disability Coalition (NBDC) and Vice Chair of the New Jersey Black Issues Convention (NJ BIC). In 2009, at her behest, a BIC Board Member and State Senate Leader championed legislation t...read more

Jane Dunhamn will present Award

September 18th, NBDC Director, and Vice Chair of the NJ Black Issues Convention, Jane Dunhamn will present the NBDC Outstanding Service Award and the NJ Black Issues Convention Proclamation to Margaret Battle Winchester at a luncheon held at the Margaret Winchester Enrichment Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired, 168 Sunny Slope Drive, Bridgeton, NJ.

Jerome Harris' most recent position was the Interim Director of the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice (NJISJ).

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Thursday, September 17 
12:00–1:30pm
CER Colloquia Series:   Wheelchair Politics: Disability and Violent Masculinities within a Gang

Laurence Ralph, Associate Professor, Anthropology and African and African American Studies, Harvard University

My paper argues that, while admirable, the focus on assuaging social difference within the disability right’s movement has served to obscure key distinctions within disabled communities along the axes of race, socioeconomic status, and gender. While the larger community of disabled activists tends to use the social model of d...read more

School to Prison Pipeline, Incarceration, Poverty & Disparities

The experience of disability is different for members of the Black community. From birth, many African Americans are born into a world which does not make all resources available for them to flourish and succeed. Many of our Black male youth, especially with disabilities, experience the phenomenon called the “School-to-Prison-Pipeline” where they are put on a life-path that will result in them dropping out of school, getting involved in crime-related activities, and later be...read more

Positive language empowers. When writing or speaking about people with disabilities, there are two schools of thought. 

The language from the social model of disability separates impairment from disability. Impairment is defined as the functional limitations of bodies and minds and disability is defined as the barriers of unequal access, negative attitudes, discrimination and oppression. Hence, disabled person is accepted because it describes the person experiences oppression because of his or her impairment. I am disabled and disabled person is acceptable however, it is important to...read more

Disability Culture is not unlike Black Culture in that it is a widely-used concept to capture lifestyle that are caused or promoted by disability, where similarly Black Culture captures lifestyle that is unique to the Black experience. Disability cultures exist as communities of people around topics of disability and shared experiences. Steven Brown, in an academic study, wrote, "The existence of a disability culture is a relatively new and contested idea. Not surprising, perhaps, for a group that has long been described with terms like 'in-valid', 'impaired', 'limited', 'crippled', and so ...read more

Beyond health the increasing cause of physical disability among Black people has become police brutality. Like Fannie Lou Manner who had polio in her youth and her activism lead to the beating by police and then more beating in jail by Black prisoners who took orders by a white highway officer, leaving her more physically disabled. Her testimony is so powerful.. Sounds like today! Police brutality against Black people, Black women and Black disabled people, Black Queer people, Black Trans and Black poor people sadly is not new! Listen..
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image of "Black Autist" aka Timotheus “Pharaoh” GordonThe article is the second in a series of 5 interviews on Police Brutality by Leroy Moore.  Look for future articles.

Krip-Hop - In this series I made an effort to pick out Black disabled activists and bloggers who have been outspoken on this issue of police brutality against people with disabilities especially Black disabled people.  So tell us first how did you get into blogging/journalism and did you write on police brutality against Black disabled people?

Timotheus “Pharaoh” Gordon – Writing has been my passion since I was a child, and I started out writing and performing poetry. By the time I entered the MFA Writing program at SCAD-Atlanta, I had to make a career change. Since it’s difficult to make money as just a poet, my professors advised me to dabble in other forms of writing that not only helps pay the bills, but also enable me to use the skills I’ve obtained in poetry.

Bl...read more

A trial begins this week in an important case for the disability rights community. The case highlights the urgency of protecting the rights of disabled people to communication, self-determination, loving relationships, marriage, and equal treatment within the court system.  Read about it here: 


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If you live in the NJ / NY area, please atten...read more

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