Welcome


NBDC is the nation’s organization for all Black disabled people.  Membership and partners includes Black disabled organizations, disabled people, parents, family members, faith based, non-profits, and academic and policy leaders.

Founded in 1990, in response to the need for Black disabled people to organize around mutual concerns, NBDC is dedicated to examining and improving; community leadership, family inclusion, entrepreneurship, civil rights, service delivery systems, education and information and Black disabled identity and culture through the lenses of ableism and racism. Select here for welcome video.


"Yes, today’s session was a tremendous first step for individual American Council of the Blind (ACB) members as well as ACB the organization. After the session today, my sister who was on the call, and I had a long conversation about our family and of our feelings on all that is happening today.  We both remembered with a mix of love and disrespect how as teenagers, an uncle of ours that we really loved would use racist words. We did call him on it, but he thought it was funny and I don’t know how much of a difference it made to him. We were so young then, but at least now as middle aged adults we know we at least said something. It was really good for me to have this conversation with her."


"I agree with MCAC members (Multicultural Committee American Council of the Blind)  that we have discovered a treasure in you (Jane Dunhamn) and I definitely want to keep in touch!" NBDC Disability Anti Racism Training Oct. 2020 for the American Council of the Blind

How Families Are Fighting Racism And Disability Discrimination

by Claudia Boyd-Barrett, California Health Report | November 9, 2020

LOS ANGELES — Ever since her son, Landon, was born three years ago, Nakenya Allen has been fighting.

Fighting to get a diagnosis for the cause of Landon’s digestive problems, which landed him in the emergency room multiple times before he turned 18 months old. Fighting to get doctors to take her concerns about her son’s constant distress seriously. And, after he was diagnosed with a rare birth defect in his spinal cord, fighting with medical and disability service providers to get financial support for his care.

Race and Disability: NHL Team Cuts Ties With Draft Pick Over Bullying Of Classmate With Disabilities

By Mark Monroe, The Blade/TNS | November 3, 2020 -- TOLEDO, Ohio — The Arizona Coyotes announced late last week that the NHL franchise has renounced the rights to Sylvania native Mitchell Miller after a bullying incident in junior high school came to light.

He and the Coyotes organization have come under intense scrutiny after a report surfaced that Miller had bullied a Black classmate with developmental disabilities in 2016.

Miller was selected by the Coyotes in the fourth round of the 2020 NHL draft on Oct. 7. The 18-year-old defenseman, who is a freshman at the University of North Dakota, was selected with the 111th overall pick of the 2020 draft.

Education Department Addresses Special Ed Concerns Related To COVID-19

By Michelle Diament | November 2, 2020 -- With two new guidance documents, federal education officials are clarifying issues facing both young children with disabilities and those transitioning to adulthood amid the pandemic.

The U.S. Department of Education issued question-and-answer documents in recent weeks aimed at two very different groups — infants and toddlers with disabilities who are just starting their educational journey, as well as transition-age students and adults receiving services through vocational rehabilitation.

Struggling To Connect Through A Screen, Special Ed Teachers Make House Calls

by David Mekeel, Reading Eagle/TNS | October 30, 2020

READING, Pa. — For the first few weeks of the school year, Leslie Esterly struggled to connect with Levi Wilson.

With the COVID-19 pandemic far from over, the Reading School District began classes this fall virtually. That meant Esterly, who teaches students with multiple disabilities at Lauer’s Park Elementary School, was introduced to the 6-year-old kindergartner online.

“He never met me before the screen,” Esterly said.

State Offers Money to Special Ed Students Affected By School Shutdowns

October 27, 2020 - Texas public school students with severe cognitive disabilities could receive up to $1,500 for tutoring, therapy, and other support services to address any learning disruptions suffered during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Texas Education Agency and Gov. Greg Abbott announced the creation of the $30 million effort — the Supplementary Special Education Services program — last week.

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