Welcome


NBDC is the nation’s organization for all Black disabled people.  Membership and partners includes Black disabled organizations, disabled people, parents, family members, faith based, non-profits, and academic and policy leaders.

Founded in 1990, in response to the need for Black disabled people to organize around mutual concerns, NBDC is dedicated to examining and improving; community leadership, family inclusion, entrepreneurship, civil rights, service delivery systems, education and information and Black disabled identity and culture through the lenses of ableism and racism. Select here for welcome video.


"Yes, today’s session was a tremendous first step for individual American Council of the Blind (ACB) members as well as ACB the organization. After the session today, my sister who was on the call, and I had a long conversation about our family and of our feelings on all that is happening today.  We both remembered with a mix of love and disrespect how as teenagers, an uncle of ours that we really loved would use racist words. We did call him on it, but he thought it was funny and I don’t know how much of a difference it made to him. We were so young then, but at least now as middle aged adults we know we at least said something. It was really good for me to have this conversation with her."


"I agree with MCAC members (Multicultural Committee American Council of the Blind)  that we have discovered a treasure in you (Jane Dunhamn) and I definitely want to keep in touch!" NBDC Disability Anti Racism Training Oct. 2020 for the American Council of the Blind

Availability of mental health services impacts police officer actions

Treatment Advocacy Center: Research of the Month

The role of police in ensuring public safety is a topical issue for policy debates in today’s society. Concerns around the appropriateness of law enforcement in responding to mental health crisis calls are chief among these policy discussions. New research published this month in the Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology suggests that the availability of mental health services has an impact on police officers’ actions in response to a mental health call for service, such as their choice to arrest, divert to mental health treatment or informally resolve on the scene.

Our babies are ‘just different:’ A tragic death and Black parents’ fears for special children

Lincoln Hook’s mother says that though he is an outgoing and always-smiling six-year-old, his school doesn’t know how to deal with him.

 

NIMHD’s Partner, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., Hosts a Virtual Mental Health and Wellness Forum

NIMHD's partner, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc. (OPPF), recently held a social distancing week led by their Undergraduate Leadership Council. These young men represent colleges and universities from across the nation. During the Mental Health and Wellness presentation, OPPF Grand Basileus David Marion, Ph.D., applauded their efforts to promote the message: “There is no shame in getting help!”  Dr. Marion also discussed the Brother You’re on My Mind (BYOMM) initiative that strives to raise awareness about mental health for African American men and their families.

That all may worship. That all may serve.

That all may worship. That all may serve.

"That all may worship, That all may serve." A reading from

1 Peter 4:12-14; 5:6-11

by Scherrone Dunhamn

NBDC member organization California based Krip Hop speaks out on Black disability poverty and violence.

"They Will Be Heard: The Disabled Community's Ongoing Fight in Battle for Social Justice
The disabled community makes up a large percentage that come into violent contact with the police, but their voices are often drowned out in the battle for social justice. Activist Leroy Moore Jr. is working to make sure Americans with disabilities are heard." Link to original video and story . . .

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