Welcome


NBDC is the nation’s organization for all Black disabled people.  Membership and partners includes Black disabled organizations, disabled people, parents, family members, faith based, non-profits, and academic and policy leaders.

Founded in 1990, in response to the need for Black disabled people to organize around mutual concerns, NBDC is dedicated to examining and improving; community leadership, family inclusion, entrepreneurship, civil rights, service delivery systems, education and information and Black disabled identity and culture through the lenses of ableism and racism. Select here for welcome video.


"Yes, today’s session was a tremendous first step for individual American Council of the Blind (ACB) members as well as ACB the organization. After the session today, my sister who was on the call, and I had a long conversation about our family and of our feelings on all that is happening today.  We both remembered with a mix of love and disrespect how as teenagers, an uncle of ours that we really loved would use racist words. We did call him on it, but he thought it was funny and I don’t know how much of a difference it made to him. We were so young then, but at least now as middle aged adults we know we at least said something. It was really good for me to have this conversation with her."


"I agree with MCAC members (Multicultural Committee American Council of the Blind)  that we have discovered a treasure in you (Jane Dunhamn) and I definitely want to keep in touch!" NBDC Disability Anti Racism Training Oct. 2020 for the American Council of the Blind

My Journey to My Identity

Camilla Gilbert talks about her journey during Introduction to Disability Studies https://youtu.be/bEHMDYhuvj4

Boston University Survey on Covid and PWD

The survey does not ask any personal information, everything is private.  The survey can be done on your smart phone, tablet or computer and will take 20-45 minutes. Start Survey

Disabled, Black and searching for justice

On Sept. 16, 2016, Terence Crutcher's car stalled on a busy road on the Northside of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Crutcher, an amateur singer, had just left Tulsa Community College, where he'd found out that his summer music appreciation class had been canceled.


"What am I going to do with these books I bought?" he'd asked the professors.


Crutcher, 40, had hearing loss and was blind in his right eye, the result of an assault more than a decade earlier. Since then, he had struggled with drug abuse and depression, his twin sister, Tiffany Crutcher, said by phone. When his car broke down, she believes, he was in crisis.

Threat to Parental Rights - Black Disabled Mom Reaches Out to NBDC

My two oldest children are in two different foster homes. My two youngest children are with my aunt. All four are in the XXXXXX metro area. If I leave the state I will lose custody of all four permanently. I am paralyzed from the waist down so I need a caregiver and an emergency place to stay. Please help me. The hospital claims they cannot find any place closer to send me then a nursing home out of state because of my recent suicide attempt.

Fighting the Good Fight

Hello, I’m Sabah Muhammad, one of the newest staff members at Treatment Advocacy Center. I’m excited

to be working as legislative and policy counsel on the advocacy team, using my background as a trial lawyer and public speaker to help pass new laws across the country that will benefit people with severe mental illness and their families.

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