NAACP Petition - re: Michael Brown's Death

Please sign the NAACP petition to the Department of Justice for the further investigation into Michael Brown's death. Encourage the greater disability community to sign the petition. We must support justice work for all groups.

 
Jane Dunhamn
Director
 
The grand jury convened to investigate the shooting death of Michael Brown has chosen not to indict Officer Darren Wilson.

This is a devastating setback in our fight for justice. But the grand jury's decision does not mean a crime was not committed in Ferguson, Missouri, on August 9. It does not mean we are done fighting for Michael Brown.

We are all filled with frustration, disbelief, and anger over this decision. That the officer who shot and killed an unarmed black man with his hands in the air remains free is appalling. Local officials in Ferguson utterly failed in their duties to conduct an open and transparent investigation.

The local prosecutor who oversaw the grand jury process has significant personal, family, and professional ties to the local police department—the same local police who were slow to talk to witnesses and eager to attack protesters and journalists.

We will not allow this to be another Sanford, Florida. We will not allow the justice system to let us down once more. Take action today, for Michael, and for all of our sons.

While the NAACP joins the community in standing for peaceful protest, we will hold law enforcement officials accountable and ask that they adhere to the rules of engagement agreed upon.

We stand united with the community and other activists groups, demanding that all police officers wear operable body cameras; police departments reflect the diversity of the community that they are serving; and that Congress passes the End Racial Profiling Act.

Sign our petition to the Department of Justice right now:
http://action.naacp.org/write-the-DOJ-now

 Thank you,

Cornell William Brooks
President and CEO
NAACP

 

Documentary: "Who Am I To Stop It"

Oct 8, 2014 - "Who Am I To Stop It" is directed by Cheryl Green who has experienced brain injury. It is observational in nature, rather than relying on interviews and experts or sensationalizing the traumatic injury events. Featured artists are people rooted in society, and many of the difficulties they face--and their wonderful triumphs--happen in the interaction between them and people around them. They are not odd or disordered, even if they experience disability; they are people with agency, drive, and value. Read more »

Disparities in care for Blacks linked to segregation, unconscious bias

Black patients are less satisfied with care from doctors who show unintentional bias. Highly segregated areas have disparities in lung cancer death rates, research shows.

Two studies published in January highlight the challenges blacks face in accessing equitable, quality health care. In one study, primary care physicians found to have unconscious bias against blacks received
lower marks from their African-American patients on measures of trust and communication skills. Another study found that racial segregation exacerbates disparities in lung cancer mortality. More than 130 Denver-area
primary care doctors and other health professionals such as nurse practitioners took psychological tests that measure implicit bias toward different racial and ethnic groups. Read the entire article in American Medical News
 

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